Benjamin B. Warfield on Robert Lewis Dabney: Nine Reviews (1891–1905)

The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 1 (1890)

In 1890 Benjamin B. Warfield helped found The Reformed and Presbyterian Review, and remained its chief editor for its twelve years of existence until 1902. In this publication Warfield reviewed a number of book by or about Robert Lewis Dabney. Here is a listing of all (I believe!) of Warfield’s literary reviews of Dabney, as well as one from the Presbyterian Quarterly and another later review from The Princeton Theological Review. I have included OCRed pdfs and links to the originals on Google Books.

(My analysis of Warfield’s treatment of Dabney’s legacy in the last two review articles can be found here: ““May His Memory Be Increased!”: Benjamin B. Warfield on Robert Lewis Dabney and Race.”)

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of Discussions Vol. 1: Theological and Evangelical, by Robert L. Dabney,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 2 (1891): 714.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of Discussions Vol. 2: Evangelical, by Robert L. Dabney,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 3 (1892): 593.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of Discussions Vol. 3: Philosophical, by Robert L. Dabney,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 5 (1894): 359.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of The Five Points of Calvinism, by R. L. Dabney,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 8 (1897): 360.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of Memorial Volume of the Westmin­ster Assembly, 1647-1897,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 9 (1898): 178–79.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield(?), “Review of Christ Our Penal Substitute, by Robert L. Dabney,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 10 (1899): 370.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • B. B. Warfield, “Review: Dabney’s Christ Our Penal Substitute” The Presbyterian Quarterly 45 (1898): 440–42.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of In Memoriam: Robert Lewis Dabney,” The Presbyterian and Reformed Review 12 (1901): 320–21.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

  • Benjamin B. Warfield, “Review of The Life and Letters of Robert Lewis Dabney, by Thomas Cary John­son,” The Princeton Theological Review 12 (1905): 155–57.

pdf here | original on Google Books here

Comparing Princeton, Edwards, and the Dutch on the Bible and Society

Mark Noll contributed a chapter to Reformed Theology in America on “The Princeton Theology.” Toward the end, he compares the theologians of Princeton with two other representatives of Reformed theology: Jonathan Edwards and the Dutch. His second point of comparison, on the Bible and society, was illuminating:

“Second, the three differed in how their approach to Scripture affected their picture of the Christian’s task in society. Princeton used the Bible to construct dogma, while it was content to accept the cultural conventions of the merchant-yeoman middle class without question. To Edwards the Bible was a resource for reflective piety, for discovering the divine and supernatural light that graciously converts the darkened heart; his absorption was so thorough on this theme that he seems to have given little thought to the late-Puritan society in which he lived. The Dutch, by contrast, almost defined themselves by their capacity to find scriptural principles for cultural formation, whether in education, politics, voluntary organizations, or economics. These varied uses of Scripture have appeared complementary in some circumstances and competitive in others” (28–29).